By Kaitlyn Nielson Mace

VP of Internships

Hey seniors! Did you know that graduation is only 30 days away? Let me break it down for you-- 13 days of class, 4 days of finals, 5 days of spring break, and 8 days of weekend. When you look at it that it looks like you have more days without school than with it, but of course you’re more stressed than ever before.

Why? Maybe because you have finals to worry about, that one class you might not even pass, and that boy you still haven’t had the guts to talk to—but most of all, you have no idea what you’re doing after you graduate.

So what can you do? Search for jobs now! I know you have a lot on your plate, but we’re here to help you! Take a second and read Greg Baubien’s article from The Public Relations Strategist ‘Career Advice for College Graduates: Navigating Today’s Job Market’

I might be beating a dead horse when I say you should do an internship and with graduation being right around the corner (literally) you might think it’s too late for you to do one, but I’m here to tell you that IT’S NOT TOO LATE.  Yes, you will be graduated so you don’t need the credit. And yes, it’s not a permanent position. But it is definitely a step in the right direction. Internships will give your resume an extra boost to put you one step above the rest. They can also help you network with professionals in your industry and that might open the door to a permanent position. Don’t be afraid to accept an internship after you graduate.

Next, be willing to do the dirty work. Don’t forget that you’re still on the bottom of the totem pole. Find entry-level positions and apply to them like crazy. Don’t know where to find jobs? Go to these websites and I know you’ll find something:

Don’t just look for any job, look for your career. I might have contradicted my last paragraph, but hear me out. I am a firm believer that if you can find the right company you will love your career. So what should you look for in an employer? May I suggest good looks and a nice bank account? But on a more serious note, find a company whose culture fits you and your life. Some people enjoy wearing suits and carrying briefcases while other people are more productive wearing a t-shirt and jeans. Maybe you like a relaxed atmosphere that has strict deadlines. Find whatever culture will help you be successful and love your job. You should also look for a company you can grow with if you want to stay with them forever. Whatever you do, make sure you really want to work for the companies you are applying for.

Well, that’s it. Alright not really, but if you still feel lost and need help, use your resources on campus while you still have them. The Career Development Center (LC 409) was created to help students find jobs after they graduate. They have a lot of great connections and can help you beef up your resume. Another resource is your professors. You might think you can just write them off, but don’t ruin your relationship with them just yet (or ever). They have a lot of great connections too and can be a great reference to use when you apply for jobs.  

T-minus 30 days. You can do this. If you need help, please don’t hesitate to contact the board. We’d love to help you too! We’ll see you at the finish line.

http://wvtf.org/post/school-divisions-could-have-flexibility-graduation-requirements


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AuthorUVU PRSSA

 

Have you ever made a list of things you thought was important to have in your career? How about what personally motivates you in your career? 

When we really break down what is important to us, one thing that people always want is having a career that they love doing. However, what happens if you have the career you love but are receiving low compensation? Or what about a job that has high compensation, but is something you absolutely hate? In the book, "How Will You Measure Your Life?" by Clatyon M. Christensen, he goes into depth about balancing your incentives and motivations. Examples of incentives are status, compensation, security, or work conditions and motivations are things like personal growth, recognition, responsibility, or love for your job. Now, after reading this it might seem like we are going to say you need to pick and choose. False. This chapter talks about needing a balance of the two. They both have their ups and positives, but motivational tends to be the one that people suggest to focus on. In the book, Christensen isn't tell us to pick one or the other. We need to make sure we have a balance of both and aren't just settling for one.

These factors are extremely important when helping us to decide what career to go into, but it not only is important in our career, but in our personal lives as well. In the book Christensen tells a story about his two sons and his experience with building a playhouse. His two sons couldn't wait to get outside and work on the playhouse every day with dad. But, once that playhouse was done, the two sons immediately lost interest and hardly ever played in it. Christensen explains that it wasn't about having the playhouse, it was about building the playhouse. The two boys felt proud and accomplished as they were building their playhouse with their dad. To them it was important to do the work and spend time with dad. That was their motivation and incentive. 

By not settling and combining both our incentives and motivations, you can have the career of your dreams. Not only will you enjoy going to work, but you will be happier in our every day life. 

"Do what you love, and you'll never work a day in your life (Christensen, pg 38)."

 

Written by Brianna Jordan

VP of Member Services

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AuthorUVU PRSSA

Many times, marketing professionals and public relations professionals assume that people buy products solely because of their demographics. In Clayton Christensen's book "How Will You Measure Your Life?" he states that customers buy products because they have a job that needs to be done, and that product will help them do so. He says that people "hire" products to get jobs done. A fast food restaurant that sold milkshakes approached Christensen and his business partner for help. The restaurant wanted to know how they could improve their milkshake so that more people will want to buy more of them. Christensen's colleague Bob Moesta asked "I wonder what job arises in people's lives that causes them to come to this restaurant to 'hire' a milkshake?" What they found was that most people were buying milkshakes in the morning. Christensen and Moesta asked many of these people why they were buying milkshakes in the morning, and what job they were getting done by hiring a milkshake. Most of the people were hiring the milkshake to make their commute less boring while warding off the morning hunger. 

Christensen asked some of these customers what other products they have tried hiring before to get this same job done and the answers were very intuitive. One of the customers said that they tried a banana before, but it was gone too quick and they were hungry earlier. Someone else said they hired a bagel one time but it was bland without cream cheese and it was difficult to put cream cheese on their bagel while they were driving. Another person said they tried a Snickers, but they felt too guilty eating candy for breakfast. 

The milkshake was the best because it took so long to suck up through the straw and it was substantial enough to keep the mid-morning hunger away. The restaurant was able to realize how to improve the milkshake to do this job even better. They could make it thicker so it takes people even longer to suck it up through the straw. They couild also put little pieces of fruit in it to make the long commute a little more interesting. "The unexpected pieces of fruit would do just that."

When you're wondering how to improve a product or service, think about the job people hire your product for.

Seth Gutzwiller

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AuthorUVU PRSSA

How Public Relations Professionals Can Say “No”

There is no need to take on an assignment that will not benefit your organization or company, let alone the company or organization that is seeking to hire you. Public relations involves adhering to ethics and this includes only taking on tasks that you know have the potential for success, not tasks that don’t have the potential for success. Don’t worry about this reflecting negatively on your capabilities or skill set, it won’t.

When to Say “No”

Say "no" before taking on a project. If you agree to take on an assignment, take it on. You're giving the client the “green light,” meaning you're opening the door for them to depend on you. It’s your responsibility to research a company or cause before taking on the responsibility of doing their public relations.

Say "no" if you feel a product or cause is out of your scope. If your company or agency specializes in a specific market, it may be wise to stick to the market it's known for. An exception would be a project that you feel is one of a kind project that won't be a major conflict of interest.

Say "no" if you don’t feel you can meet the deadline. There are companies that rush to find an agency or public relations specialist to take on projects that haven't even been started. Even if you believe in miracles, the chances of meeting a given deadline may be far and in-between. Offer an alternative deadline or give a list of what can be done by the deadline before turning down a request.

How to Say “No”

Lead with a "thank you." If you are chosen to lead a company in their marketing efforts, they obviously feel that you are capable of helping them increase their visibility, credibility, and valuation. Acknowledge that your hard work has been acknowledged.

Let the company know why you can’t meet their needs. Whether it be a deadline, conflict of interest, or something that is outside of the scope of what you would normally do, be honest about the reasons why you're turning down an assignment.

Recommend other resources for getting the job accomplished. There will come a time when you will be "booked up," or something will be out of your scope of work. Provide recommendations to people, agencies, or companies who can perform certain job functions.

For more ways to say "no" click here

Historian: Charonda Edwards

Contact: charonda.g.edwards@gmail.com

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AuthorUVU PRSSA

Creating a Successful Grassroots Campaign

  Be SMART. Make sure goals are Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and Timely. This can be something as simple as deciding how many people you want to recruit to your campaign by the end of the month. Create a strategy. Strategies are a means to put a plan in place and tactics are how that plan will take place. For each strategy, there needs to be numerous tactics to put the plan into motion. Communicate. Communicating with the public is very important to any grassroots campaign. Be specific, choose the right audience, and use clear and concise language when stating the campaign’s purpose. Update media. All social media, digital media, and media needs to be updated to reflect all current changes of a grassroots campaign. Every grassroots event needs to be documented and placed in a portfolio for the public to view. Get fundraising. All campaigns require financial investments in order to be successful. The size of the campaign and purpose determines who much money will be spent. Create and organize communities. Create communities that reflect and embody the purpose of the campaign. Engaging the community is a wonderful way to gain insight, share stories, and organize meetings. Build relationships with policy makers. Educate and engage policy makers on organizational causes. Invite them to be part of the campaigning process. Become involved in organizations that policy makers frequent. Work with them to understand what is and isn't legal when campaigning. Build coalitions. Band together with a group of people who are advocating for the same purpose. There is strength in numbers. The more people who are involved, the more the public becomes aware of the campaign. Be ready! Grassroots campaigns often require physical labor, in the heat or cold. It's important to dress accordingly and bring supplies that will allow the campaign to run smoothly. Watch the weather reports and bring an extra set of clothes, or two.   Historian: Charonda Edwards Contact at 435-830-6295, charonda.g.edwards@gmail.com      

 

Be SMART.

Make sure goals are Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and Timely. This can be something as simple as deciding how many people you want to recruit to your campaign by the end of the month.

Create a strategy.

Strategies are a means to put a plan in place and tactics are how that plan will take place. For each strategy, there needs to be numerous tactics to put the plan into motion.

Communicate.

Communicating with the public is very important to any grassroots campaign. Be specific, choose the right audience, and use clear and concise language when stating the campaign’s purpose.

Update media.

All social media, digital media, and media needs to be updated to reflect all current changes of a grassroots campaign. Every grassroots event needs to be documented and placed in a portfolio for the public to view.

Get fundraising.

All campaigns require financial investments in order to be successful. The size of the campaign and purpose determines who much money will be spent.

Create and organize communities.

Create communities that reflect and embody the purpose of the campaign. Engaging the community is a wonderful way to gain insight, share stories, and organize meetings.

Build relationships with policy makers.

Educate and engage policy makers on organizational causes. Invite them to be part of the campaigning process. Become involved in organizations that policy makers frequent. Work with them to understand what is and isn't legal when campaigning.

Build coalitions.

Band together with a group of people who are advocating for the same purpose. There is strength in numbers. The more people who are involved, the more the public becomes aware of the campaign.

Be ready!

Grassroots campaigns often require physical labor, in the heat or cold. It's important to dress accordingly and bring supplies that will allow the campaign to run smoothly. Watch the weather reports and bring an extra set of clothes, or two.

 

Historian: Charonda Edwards

Contact at 435-830-6295, charonda.g.edwards@gmail.com

 

 

 

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AuthorUVU PRSSA